Do you have heard, that the Xenxo-engine is now licensed under the same license like Godot?

theuserbltheuserbl Posts: 1Member

I have red in the news, that the Xenk engine is now also OpenSource under the MIT-license
https://xenko.com/
https://github.com/xenko3d/xenko/

Answers

  • TwistedTwiglegTwistedTwigleg Posts: 784Admin

    The Xenko game engine looks pretty cool! I plan to play around with it at some point, but because the editor runs only on Windows I’m a little hesitant to invest the time and energy into learning Xenko right now.

    That said, it looks really cool! It would be interesting to see if things from Xenko can be used with Godot, and vice versa.

    Once RandomMomentania is a little more stable and more tutorials are out, I may see about getting the Xenko editor working on Linux and MacOS as a way to practice my C# skills. If I can get the Xenko editor working on Linux and MacOS, then I’ll probably do some tutorials for Xenko too!

    All in all, Xenko looks pretty cool! I’m going to stick with Godot for the foreseeable future, but Xenko is pretty tempting.

  • Ace DragonAce Dragon Posts: 203Member

    Remember this though, trying out Xenko means you're going back to a workflow where you have an explicit separation between game objects and level geometry (so things you can do in Godot such as full reuse of level pieces with their own logic may not apply).

    In my opinion, the scene-based workflow in Godot is its greatest asset and a good hook for prospective developers in a crowded market.

  • TwistedTwiglegTwistedTwigleg Posts: 784Admin

    @Ace Dragon said:
    Remember this though, trying out Xenko means you’re going back to a workflow where you have an explicit separation between game objects and level geometry ...

    Very true. Having used Godot almost exclusively for a couple years, it may be a little jarring to change workflows so dramatically. When I worked with Unity for a game jam game (after using Godot for a year plus a few months) I didn’t find the change too bad, but I’m pretty flexible :smile:

    In my opinion, the scene-based workflow in Godot is its greatest asset and a good hook for prospective developers in a crowded market

    I really like the scene based workflow Godot provides, especially in comparison to the prefab workflow. With nested prefabs you can have a similar workflow to that of Godot, though it is not quite as nice, but livable enough for me.

    Regardless, I’m still sticking with Godot. I am just thinking of trying Xenko. Making Xenko cross platform would mostly be for the challenge it provides, because I can fairly easily get everything I need for development setup (C# is way easier to setup than C++ in my opinion), and because it seems like a fun way to brush up on my C# skills while helping a new game engine.

  • emo10001emo10001 Posts: 121Member

    I have looked at the Xenko engine a number of times. it does look great...really nice graphics.

    My issue is...I have to keep my ADD in check. I personally don't have enough experience to bounce from engine to engine. I have to make myself finish at least 1 complete game in Godot before I start learning another engine. Otherwise I'll NEVER get anything done! :neutral:

    Maybe someday

    -emo

  • RukiriRukiri Posts: 58Member
    edited August 10

    Godot in many ways is a lot like Game Maker which is why I see a lot of Game Maker devs move to Godot, Xenko looks cool but silicon graphics hasn't been relevant for years now! Do you remember back in the day if you were doing anything 3d you were using a SG machine? How the times have changed for the better!

    One of the reasons why I'm moving to Godot is that for the most part it's like GM but it takes it up a notch allowing me to reuse scenes which then I can focus on specific parts of a game. I haven't quite figured out some rpg stuff and how to apply them to the player and ally scenes but... getting there.

    The UI isn't as clean as Godot and even Unity feels modern... yea, I still like gradients so bite me! In the end I think Godot has a better workflow from what I've seen (all from gamesfromscratch youtube channel...) than xenko.

    I don't know if Xenko supports consoles but I know there is a service for Godot anyway to get the game exported to a certain platform. In the end if you really are serious about 3D you will be using CryEngine or Unreal, nothing comes close to blueprints! Unity also is a good contender here, Godot is getting better but don't kid yourself if it's competing in the 3D field.

    2D is and should be the main focus for Godot, it's personally it's strength and why I use it over Unity.

  • Ace DragonAce Dragon Posts: 203Member

    I don't know if Xenko supports consoles but I know there is a service for Godot anyway to get the game exported to a certain platform. In the end if you really are serious about 3D you will be using CryEngine or Unreal, nothing comes close to blueprints! Unity also is a good contender here, Godot is getting better but don't kid yourself if it's competing in the 3D field.

    About those blueprints, the comments from actual users in the Unreal community suggests they are not the pinnacle of innovation in game logic as people make them out to be.

    The vast majority of users will eventually move to C++ entirely or mix in C++ to do things they can't easily do with the blueprints. Where this type of system falls down really is when they try to be literal programming in a visual form. Node-based programming works best when they are higher level and more self-contained actions and triggers that can be manipulated using scripts if needed.

  • MagicLordMagicLord Posts: 578Unconfirmed
    edited August 14

    @theuserbl said:
    I have red in the news, that the Xenk engine is now also OpenSource under the MIT-license
    https://xenko.com/
    https://github.com/xenko3d/xenko/

    The developers seemed not very involved, not very active with the community, it is Windows only games, perhaps those are some reasons why not many people used it ?
    Perhaps the project will grow and turn into another open source successful game engine.

    Lot of people want 3D engines with no strings attached, fortunately Godot is growing strong on 3D, and there is some promising ones like Armory 3D, or ToyEngine a new one in it's early developments
    https://toyengine.io/

  • tomarlo4tomarlo4 Posts: 6Member

    this engine drove away many people when it was initially said to be totally free but when released version 2.0 it was paid (with dat "closed source" sponsors, I would not doubt much)
    and the support for 1.0 was down
    actually it isnt a company anymore, but one-person stand being helped by community
    export to mac, linux and mobiles with opengl and gles too (i think dat i read this in the docs), but these platform dont have any editor at all
    idk if i'll trust in the development

    i pass

    godot or even urho3d > xenko

    my viewpoint

  • MagicLordMagicLord Posts: 578Unconfirmed
    edited August 14

    @tomarlo4 said:

    i pass

    godot or even urho3d > xenko

    my viewpoint

    Urho 3D is hard to code with C++ and it lacks good and complete editor and tools, for me Godot >>> Urho 3D

    @tomarlo4 said:
    this engine drove away many people when it was initially said to be totally free but when released version 2.0 it was paid (with dat "closed source" sponsors, I would not doubt much)
    and the support for 1.0 was down
    actually it isnt a company anymore, but one-person stand being helped by community
    export to mac, linux and mobiles with opengl and gles too (i think dat i read this in the docs), but these platform dont have any editor at all

    Looking at roadmap, many important not completed or started; and it will need some impressive game demo we can edit and run that would showcase it's capabilities and performance.
    I found it's lot more complicated to use and code than UE4 Blueprints or Unity C#.

  • tomarlo4tomarlo4 Posts: 6Member
    edited August 14

    @MagicLord said:
    Urho 3D is hard to code with C++ and it lacks good and complete editor and tools, for me Godot >>> Urho 3D

    :open_mouth:
    but urho3d not using the source is angelscript, is more easy using editor directly than c++, angelscript is based on c++ but don't use .h, is just .as (.cpp), and the code is short (idk about performance)
    about the editor and tools i know that is hard to use but is complete, u just need "play" with the editor while u code the script and use commandline to import models or other things
    i taked 1 week to understand how engine works (no thinking about the code) and how to pack the data files and encrypt the code (no coding by source), but the engine is interesting (saying: good at all) by itself ^^
    u have the engine 100% in ur hands, source or not
    and its possible cross-platform even not coding by source

    and yeah godot > urho3d xD
    like i said: "godot !or even urho3d! > xenko" (godot > urho3d > xenko)

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