[Linux noob] Where do you place your Godot executable ?

NeoDNeoD Posts: 130Member
edited February 2017 in General Chat

Hello. I installed a dual boot on my PC because I'm stucked with Scons on Windows.
Most Linux tutorials talks about package manager only and discourage to download executable files.
Godot for Linux is available like a Windows executable. It runs like a .exe on my Linux LMDE.

So I want to know where do you unzip Godot in your Linux directory to maintain a manageable system ?

Comments

  • keltwookiekeltwookie Posts: 172Moderator
    edited February 2017

    Hi

    You just have to create your workspace into the /home/username directory

    And no worries, It works perfectly, I use myself a Debian distro and Debian devs are more than paranoid about stability. Absolutely no problems until now :)

  • NeoDNeoD Posts: 130Member

    If the executable location is not a problem I think about creating a folder "Godot" in /usr/bin because it seems the softwares are here. And my projects will be in my /home/username directory.

  • keltwookiekeltwookie Posts: 172Moderator
    edited February 2017

    I would suggest instead creating a "Godot" directory into your userspace.

    /usr/bin should be accessible by admin (root) only. All Linux communities strongly discourage to use the root space as simple user.

    EDIT: /usr/bin is used by packets managers during softwares install but in this case you have to be logged as root. Sometimes I do a little tweaks into the root space (mount point: /)but it is very rare

  • NeoDNeoD Posts: 130Member

    Ok I unzipped Godot into my home directory something like this /home/your_user_name/Dev/Godot/Godot_2.1.1

    Now I'm looking for adding Godot into the Mate menu like the other softwares.

  • keltwookiekeltwookie Posts: 172Moderator

    Another suggestion if you please:

    If you are a former Windows user, try cinnamon as desktop, more user-friendly IMHO

  • CalinouCalinou Posts: 161Admin Godot Developer
    edited February 2017

    If you want to make Godot available to all users, it's best to place the binary in /usr/local/bin and rename it to something like godot.

    You can then create a .desktop file to make it available in the menu, containing this:

    [Desktop Entry]
    Version=1.0
    Type=Application
    Name=Godot
    GenericName=Game engine
    Comment=2D and 3D game engine
    Exec=/usr/local/bin/godot
    Terminal=false
    Categories=Game;
    

    Place that newly created file in /usr/local/share/applications, and you should be good to go.

    I haven't looked into providing an icon to the .desktop file, but if you need an icon, here's one in PNG format.

    Note that for placing files in /usr/local, you need administrative rights (you can use sudo mv <source> <destination> to move files using the command line).

  • danjodanjo Posts: 81Member

    I put the executables in ~/bin, which is in $PATH and I would recommend starting Godot from a terminal. It's way more comfortable to read the output of your game there than in the editor. It also sometimes gives you helpful error messages you don't get in the editor.

  • NeoDNeoD Posts: 130Member

    @Calinou said:
    If you want to make Godot available to all users, it's best to place the binary in /usr/local/bin and rename it to something like godot.

    You can then create a .desktop file to make it available in the menu, containing this:

    [Desktop Entry]
    Version=1.0
    Type=Application
    Name=Godot
    GenericName=Game engine
    Comment=2D and 3D game engine
    Exec=/usr/local/bin/godot
    Terminal=false
    Categories=Game;
    

    Place that newly created file in /usr/local/share/applications, and you should be good to go.

    I haven't looked into providing an icon to the .desktop file, but if you need an icon, here's one in PNG format.

    Note that for placing files in /usr/local, you need administrative rights (you can use sudo mv <source> <destination> to move files using the command line).

    Did you put the export templates in /usr/local/bin folder too ?

  • Zero2122Zero2122 Posts: 2Member

    For dual booting, I have a shared NTFS partition for anything that I use in both Windows and Linux. For eg. my main HD is split into three partitions, one for Windows, one for Linux and one called 'Space'. Space is where I have my Desktop folder, Download folder and anything that I want shared across OSes like documents, save game files for emulators, wallpapers etc. I also have a folder here called 'bin' for any programs that I use in both Windows and Linux, be that natively or in Wine. In here I have a 'godot' folder containing both the Linux and Windows executable and my project files.

    Using your Home folder would be fine but if you are dual booting I would highly suggest having an entire partition available for your personal needs so that your Linux user folder and Windows user folder can stay exclusive to each OS without having too much other stuff lying around. The biggest advantage to this is that you will be able to easily access your files in this shared partition no matter what OS you are running. If you are using Windows and want to quickly check something out in your project folder, you wont have to reboot into Linux just to do so. Then, as @Calinou says, simply create a Desktop file and place it in /usr/local/share/applications in order to have it easily available to launch from your programs menu.

  • NeoDNeoD Posts: 130Member
    edited February 2017

    Thanks to the .desktop file, and thanks to Calinou, Mint menu displays a nice Godot button. But this button doesn't work.

    Here is my desktop file.

    [Desktop Entry]
    Version= 2.1.2
    Type=Application
    Name=Godot Engine
    GenericName=Game engine
    Comment=2D and 3D game engine
    Exec=/usr/local/bin/Godot_2_1_2/godot
    Terminal=false
    Icon=/usr/local/bin/Godot/godot.png
    

    I can launch godot trough the folders or trough a desktop shortcut too, but I found this a bit dirty. I'm trying to achieve a nice installation.

    @Zero2122
    I already have an "OS-agnostic" partition for Godot projects and for any personal file who can be opened on both OSes ;)
    But my executables and software folders are stored in their "OS-related" partition.

    @keltwookie
    I tested Cinnamon with a live usb but I didn't found a way to set the task bar on the side.
    After some hours I discovered annoying issues on the Mate vertical task bar.
    I'm looking for solutions. I found vertical task panel more comfortable for web pages reading.

  • NeoDNeoD Posts: 130Member

    I try to export a project for Linux platform but I don't know how to run the exported binary. The dialog box asks for the application type. The solution is probably obvious for a used Linux user.

  • CalinouCalinou Posts: 161Admin Godot Developer
    edited March 2017

    @NeoD said:
    I try to export a project for Linux platform but I don't know how to run the exported binary. The dialog box asks for the application type. The solution is probably obvious for a used Linux user.

    Open a terminal, place yourself in the folder containing the Linux binary (using the cd command), then type: chmod +x name_of_binary, replacing name_of_binary with the binary name. You can then run it by typing ./name_of_binary.

    This will make the game binary executable (it's a Linux security restriction that newly created files are not executable by default). There is an issue on GitHub about Godot marking them as executable by default.

  • NeoDNeoD Posts: 130Member
    edited March 2017

    @Calinou said:
    This will make the game binary executable (it's a Linux security restriction that newly created files are not executable by default). There is an issue on GitHub about Godot marking them as executable by default.

    It works, thanks !
    I will read the Github issue. A ".deb" package to download Godot would be cool too !

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